Federal Tax

Profit shifting by multinationals poses a major challenge in international taxation. The ability of multinational enterprises to shift the location of profits from high-tax to low-tax jurisdictions and tax havens erodes the corporate income tax base in high-tax countries. For example, a multinational with patents owned by an Irish affiliate can shift profits from high-tax
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The Biden administration recently cited an analysis from Treasury claiming that “the President’s agenda will protect 97 percent of small business owners from income tax rate increases.” However, the figure is misleading. To assess the economic effect of higher marginal tax rates, it matters how much income or investment will be affected—not how many taxpayers.
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Key Findings Taxpayers reported nearly $11.8 trillion of total income on their 2018 tax returns. About 67 percent ($7.9 trillion) of the total income reported on Form 1040 consisted of wages and salaries, and 82 percent of all tax filers reported earning wage income. Retirement accounts such as 401(k)s and pensions are important sources of
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Recent Biden administration proposals rely heavily on revenue from better Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax collections to fund spending initiatives. The American Families Plan uses several avenues to reduce the tax gap (or the difference between taxes paid and taxes owed), from increasing the IRS’s tax enforcement budget to improving information technology and expanding reporting
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August 15th was the deadline to take advantage of the premium tax credits (PTC) originally provided in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and recently expanded in the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). Future extensions may provide longer-lasting benefits, although the extensions may create trade-offs for consumer choice and program costs. The ACA provided a refundable
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Key Findings We analyze four options for changing the taxation of U.S. muiltinationals: the full Biden administration proposal raises the federal corporate income tax liabilities of U.S. multinationals by $1.37 trillion over a decade; a partial version raises $580 billion; making GILTI consistent with Pillar 2 raises $137 billion; and a revenue-neutral option to fix
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Tackling climate change and shifting the economy towards renewable energy has been a key part of the Biden administration’s agenda.  However, this effort must first confront an overly complicated and non-neutral tax code, particularly in how it treats nuclear energy, for the White House to reach its ambitious goal of a 100 percent clean energy
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Now that Senate Budget Chairman Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has kicked off the budget reconciliation process to advance President Biden’s agenda, Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Angus King (I-ME) and Representative Don Beyer (D-VA) are pushing to create a new surtax on corporate book income. However, their arguments for the policy misconstrue why there are differences
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One of the proposals in Congress’ eclectic grab-bag of payfors in the bipartisan infrastructure package is an effort to curb tax evasion in cryptocurrency by imposing a series of reporting requirements on the industry. While it makes sense to ensure cryptocurrency transactions are treated similarly to other financial assets, the nature of these requirements as
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The Biden administration’s proposals to increase transfer payments and expand federal benefits in many ways resemble the social safety net policies of Scandinavian countries. To fully follow the Scandinavian model would require additional taxes that place a higher burden on middle-income earners, but instead, Biden proposes higher taxes on corporations and households making more than
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The Senate has begun deliberations over a bipartisan plan to provide $550 billion in new spending for a wide range of infrastructure projects, including roads, bridges, public transit, broadband, and the electrical grid. The good news is that lawmakers avoided raising taxes to cover the cost of the new spending and instead used some reasonable
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Starting next year, firms will need to amortize their research and development (R&D) expenses over five years rather than immediately deduct them from taxable income, a policy change designed to raise federal tax revenue in the short term. As policymakers decide on the future of this scheduled tax change, one option would be to delay
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